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BBC News - Science & Environment

Nasa chooses SpaceX to build Moon lander

SpaceX will build a lander that the US space agency will use to return humans to the Moon this decade.

Human cells grown in monkey embryos spark ethical debate

Scientists confirm they have made "chimera" embryos from long-tailed macaques and humans.

'Whitest ever' paint reflects 98% of sunlight

Researchers hope their "ultra-white" paint can save energy by reflecting sunlight from buildings.

Google Earth time-lapses show a changing planet

Satellite images collected over 37 years are combined to show how Earth in a new way.

China 'can save $1.6 trillion by scrapping coal', report says

Beijing must close 588 coal-fired power plants in a decade to meet climate pledges, experts say.

Sir David Attenborough's new doc: 'Humans are intruders'

Sir David Attenborough fronts a new documentary on lockdown's effect on the natural world.

COP26: Delaying key climate meeting preferable to 'messing it up'

Further postponement of the UK climate summit would be better than a failed event, says an expert.

US envoy John Kerry woos China over climate

US envoy John Kerry will hold talks in Shanghai ahead of a climate summit hosted by President Biden.

UK woodlands 'at crisis point' amid wildlife decline

A review of the state of Britain's native woods and trees finds only 7% are in good condition.

St Vincent volcano: Island covered in layer of grey as La Soufriere erupts

La Soufriere, on the island of St Vincent, has been erupting for the past five days.

World's wealthiest 'at heart of climate problem'

The so-called “polluter elite” must change their lifestyles to tackle climate change, a report says.

Fukushima: Japan approves releasing wastewater into ocean

Most experts say it's a normal and safe practice but environmentalists and locals are not happy.

Saving the kelp forest that stars in My Octopus Teacher

The makers of the Bafta-winning documentary want to preserve the underwater ecosystem it features.

Why India and Nepal's forest fires are worrying scientists

Activists say authorities in India and Nepal seem underprepared to fight forest fires.

Is Netflix's Seaspiracy film right about fishing damaging oceans?

Are the activities of the fishing industry destroying the world's oceans as a new film suggests?

COP26: Greta Thunberg says Glasgow summit should be postponed

The climate campaigner is concerned about the impact of Covid on attendance at the Glasgow summit.

France moves to ban short-haul domestic flights

MPs vote to stop flights where the journey could be made by train in under 2.5 hours.

City drivers 'should think twice' before buying SUVs

The boss of the RAC Foundation says drivers in urban areas should consider which car is most appropriate.

Deep sea mining to help make electric vehicles

Many companies want to exploit deep sea minerals but campaigners warn it could damage fragile ecosystems.

Yuri Gagarin: Sixty years since the first man went into space

The BBC speaks to the woman who, as a child, witnessed Yuri Gagarin's return to Earth 60 years ago.

Dinosaur-killing asteroid strike gave rise to Amazon rainforest

The asteroid that killed off the dinosaurs gave birth to tropical rainforests, a study suggests.

Long spaceflights and endurance swimming can 'shrink the heart'

Spaceflight and endurance swimming can both cause the heart to lose mass, say researchers.

Light pollution: How lockdown has darkened our skies

One impact of lockdown is that there has been a big reduction in light pollution in some areas.

'Astronauts aren't just men - we're astronauts too'

Seven-year-old Elizabeth built her own rocket and launched it into the sky during lockdown.

Climate Check, from BBC Weather

With record high CO2 levels and destructive tornadoes, Ben Rich has more on extreme weather around the globe this spring.

Would you wear 'Iron Man' body armour?

The market for exoskeletons - high-tech external body support systems - is tipped to grow strongly.

Muons: 'Strong' evidence found for a new force of nature

Physicists may have just made a major breakthrough in our understanding of the Universe.

Rare blood clots - what you need to know

We take a look at why these unusual clots happen and when they occur.

USS Johnston: Sub dives to deepest-known shipwreck

A submersible has reached the USS Johnston, which lies 6.5km beneath the waves in the Pacific.

Vitamin D: The truth about an alleged Covid ‘cover-up’

The vitamin is being studied - but why do some claim evidence is being ignored?

Science cuts could see experts leave UK, warns Nobel laureate

Nobel laureate Sir Paul Nurse also says science is crucial for dealing with climate change.

Bangladesh at 50: Why climate change could destroy my ancestral home

As Bangladesh turns 50, a UK-Bangladeshi reflects on how climate change affects his parents' country.

Source: BBC News - Science & Environment

BBC News - Science and Environment

Sir David Attenborough's new doc: 'Humans are intruders'

Sir David Attenborough fronts a new documentary on lockdown's effect on the natural world.

Aftermath of huge rockfall in Dorset filmed by drone

There are warnings that, with ground drying out, more landslips and rockfalls could happen.

Rare footage captures fight between two wild pandas

Some rare footage of two wild pandas having a fierce fight has been captured by researchers in China.

Saving the kelp forest that stars in My Octopus Teacher

The makers of the Bafta-winning documentary want to preserve the underwater ecosystem it features.

Yuri Gagarin: Sixty years since the first man went into space

The BBC speaks to the woman who, as a child, witnessed Yuri Gagarin's return to Earth 60 years ago.

Greta Thunberg not planning on attending COP26 in Glasgow

She told the BBC she was concerned about the impact of the coronavirus pandemic on attendance at COP26.

'I could photograph space my entire life'

A paediatrician describes how his love of space observation has grown during the lockdown.

Light pollution: How lockdown has darkened our skies

One impact of lockdown is that there has been a big reduction in light pollution in some areas.

Project 17: Solving Singapore's food waste problem

Shan, 17, wants to find out just how much food gets wasted in his home country of Singapore.

World’s largest ocean monitoring system BRUVS launched

Marine scientist Professor Jessica Meeuwig on her hopes for a new ocean monitoring system.

Why cutting down trees can be good for the climate

Tree felling is helping to restore an ancient ecosystem which can store even more carbon than trees do.

Regent honeyeater songbird that’s 'forgotten its song'

Regent honeyeaters have become so sparse that some of the birds have been unable to learn their song.

Texas beekeeper viral videos saving bee nests

Beekeeper Erika Thompson says the video, viewed over a million times, was "just a normal Tuesday".

Photos from Australia: Capturing 'flash rips' and 'the edge of the world'

Dene Bingham photographs dangerous seas and wild places from a remote coast in Western Australia.

Saving one of the world’s rarest toads from extinction

The harlequin toad has been successfully bred in captivity for the first time outside Panama.

Queen marks British Science Week virtually

During the virtual event the Queen was shown a meteorite that fell to Earth and classroom rockets.

Fukushima 10 years on: How the 'triple disaster' unfolded

Japan's most powerful earthquake on record caused a tsunami and a nuclear power plant meltdown.

Winchcombe meteorite: Cotswold town reacts to space rock discovery

A home in a Gloucestershire town was hit by the most valuable space rock ever to fall on the UK.

Coronavirus: Divers find Philippine reef covered with single-use face masks

Divers in the Philippines find personal protective equipment (PPE) among rubbish on a coral reef.

Could lab-grown meat help tackle climate change?

Last year Singapore approved the sale of 'chicken' grown in a lab. What is it exactly - and could it be better for the planet?

Source: BBC News - Science and Environment

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