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BBC News - Business

BHS brand to be revived online in the UK

The collapsed retailer BHS is re-launching as an online shop, selling some of the most popular items previously available on its website.

Gender pay gap to remain until 2069, report says

The gender pay gap in the UK will not close until 2069 based on current salary progressions, research suggests.

Opec plans fresh oil price talks says energy minister

The Opec oil producers group will make another attempt this week to reverse a more than two-year slump in crude prices says Algeria's energy minister.

Sports Direct: Ashley steps in as chief executive resigns

The founder and majority owner of Sports Direct, Mike Ashley, becomes chief executive after the surprise resignation of Dave Forsey.

MG ends car assembly at historic UK plant

MG announces it is to stop making cars at its Longbridge plant and will be moving production to China - ending manufacturing in the UK.

National Grid deal 'should be halted', says GMB union

The sale of National Grid's gas distribution arm should be put on hold, according to the GMB Union.

'Fit and forget' smart meters warning

The smart meters project risks being a wasted opportunity for households if they are just fitted and forgotten, a committee of MPs has said.

'I sold three new fivers for £460'

A collector who sold three new plastic £5 notes for £460 on the Ebay auction site says he will reinvest the money in his hobby.

Twitter shares soar almost 20% on takeover talk

Shares in Twitter jump more than 20% after a report that it has received takeover approaches, including from Google and Salesforce.com.

Yahoo 'state' hackers stole data from 500 million users

Yahoo says 'state-sponsored' hackers stole information from about 500 million users in 2014 in what appears to be the largest publicly disclosed cyber-breach in history.

Easyjet pilots suspend strike action pending further talks

Easyjet pilots suspend strike action while new proposals on tackling fatigue are considered.

Facebook 'overestimated' video viewing time

Facebook has overestimated how much video people have watched for the last two years, the company has admitted.

Amazon has been fined £65,000 for trying to fly dangerous goods

Online giant Amazon has been fined £65,000 after being found guilty of attempting to ship dangerous goods by air.

Court slashes damages to be paid by ex-trader Kerviel

A French appeals court has slashed the amount that rogue trader Jerome Kerviel has to pay his former employer Societe Generale to €1m.

Protect bank transfer scam victims, demands Which?

People who are tricked into transferring money to a fraudster deserve better protection, says consumer group Which?

Treasury minister Lord O'Neill quits government

Treasury minister Lord O'Neill, a key figure in pushing the Conservatives' Northern Powerhouse agenda, has resigned from the government.

CEO Secrets: Levi Roots shares his tips for success

Levi Roots, the food entrepreneur famous for his sauce, offers the business advice he wishes he had been given when he started out.

South African shops salvaging 'expired' goods

The Cape Town supermarket owner selling food past its "sell-by" date.

What if Yahoo hackers have my details?

The BBC's technology reporter Chris Foxx explains how you can stay safe following the Yahoo hack.

South Africa's bittersweet sugar tax

The impending sugar tax in South Africa is causing concern in the soft drinks industry.

The costs and challenges of an ageing population

Being positive may be key to successful ageing but the economic challenge of an ageing population is a huge global predicament.

Yahoo breach: Troy Hunt gives tips to protect yourself

Security expert Troy Hunt discusses the scale of the Yahoo breach and what steps its users should take to protect their data.

Brexit talks 'probably early 2017'

Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson has said that formal negotiations for Britain to Leave the European Union will "probably" begin in early 2017.

New fivers sell for hundreds of pounds

Why are people paying hundreds of pounds for the new plastic £5 note?

Plane crew douse smoking Samsung phone

Cabin crew on an Indian passenger aircraft have used a fire extinguisher to tackle a smoking Samsung handset.

Iceland supermarket's battle with country over name

British supermarket Iceland could face a legal battle to save its name after the Icelandic government confirms it is considering launching a lawsuit.

Prize catch

The BBC's James Badcock examines how activists doggedly pursued their country's former economy minister and IMF chief, Rodrigo Rato, over corruption claims.

Baby-sized pension?

Many stay-at-home parents have no proper pension provision - so what can they do to maximise their retirement savings?

Clothes by the kilo

Anyone over thirty-five might look at you blankly if you mention vintage kilo sales, but they are increasingly popular with teenagers and students looking for cheap, fashionable clothing.

Leadership goals

Fifa secretary general Fatma Samoura says more must be done to make all elements of the football industry more open to women and minorities.

Get off my land!

Up to a billion people in Africa derive their main income from farming, but many get embroiled in disputes over whether they really own their land. Can tech help?

Bonanza for Bosnia

Bosnia's biggest foreign investment by a Dubai-based property developer is causing some unease amongst locals. But the country needs all the help it can get.

Wealth divide

As Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt prepare to untie the knot, they will become clients of a very lucrative industry providing divorces for the super-rich.

Playing with trust

A marketing hoax of a "fired employee" going berserk with a company's Twitter account goes viral - but how effective is it when advertising plays with people's trust?

Saving honey bees

A look at the tech firms helping to save and protect the honey bee, as numbers of the vital pollinators continue to fall sharply around the world.

Women at the top

GSK has announced Emma Walmsley will be its next chief executive, taking the total of women running FTSE one hundred companies to seven. So who are the other six?

Future models

As London's autumn fashion week wraps up, what has it told us about the way the fashion industry is changing?

Testing for Ebola

Early diagnosis of disease is literally a matter of life and death, so the race is on to produce cheaper, faster, lighter kits to help doctors and nurses in the field.

Meteoric rise

A profile of virtual reality firm boss Samantha Kingston, who has enjoyed a meteoric rise after falling into the video games industry by accident.

Clean-living cattle

Some US cattle farmers are finding that smaller herds of naturally raised cows are more profitable.

Credit worthy?

Australia's biggest banks have been among the world's most profitable, but face allegations of rate-rigging and anti-competitive behaviour. Are their golden years over?

Lost in grief

Older people are increasingly saving their loved ones from the cost of a funeral by paying in advance - but many families are unaware because they are scared to talk about death.

The new sushi?

Katy Watson and Sarah Treanor visit insect farms in California and Mexico - but is bug eating, or entomophagy, really going to catch on?

More light, better life

Solar power is expanding fast in Africa, and innovative products and payment schemes are ensuring the poor and rural communities don't miss out.

Hinkley Point C

Hinkley Point: What is it and why is it important?

Trip tips

Whether you're a tourist or an executive, it isn't always easy travelling alone, especially if you're a woman. A growing number of businesses are aiming to make the experience easier.

Stuck on board

Some 60 of Hanjin Shipping's cargo vessels are stranded at sea, after the company filed for bankruptcy - with crew and cargo stuck on board. Here's the story of one of them.

Never retire

With more of us in developed countries living longer but retiring earlier, there is a growing pensions "time bomb". So could the answer be never retiring in the first place?

Breaking down bonds

BBC World Service economics correspondent Andrew Walker breaks down the world of bonds.

Beyond the safari

South Africa's tourism industry is using technology to expand the sector beyond traditional areas and appeal to modern independent travellers.

Sponsor vehicle

Japanese carmaker Nissan is one of only eight sponsors of the Uefa Champions League. What does the firm hope to achieve from its association with Europe's top football competition?

HS2 jitters

Businesses and communities want certainty about where the second phase of the HS2 rail route will go, but politics rarely provides certainty.

The last laugh

How cartoonist Mauricio de Sousa was able to get past initial rejection and go on to become Brazil's answer to Walt Disney.

In the weeds

Indonesian seaweed farmers have launched a class action lawsuit demanding compensation for the effects of Australia's worst oil spill.

Shy billionaire

How did a humble man from the Spanish coast briefly overtake Bill Gates as the world's richest man? By giving us what we want, when we want it.

Why don't UK tech firms lead the world?

Are the Americans just more determined when it comes to producing world-beating tech firms?

Tech Talent: Hassle co-founder on UK's tech problems

Internet entrepreneur Alex Depledge shares her views about how the UK can up its game when it comes to building tech companies.

London bids to drum up US interest in its tech sector

London's mayor heads to New York to drum up interest in UK tech firms.

Tech start-up funding 'appallingly bad' in UK

Star fund manager Neil Woodford says the UK is 'appallingly bad' at helping small tech start-ups find the money they need to grow.

Tech Talent: Map of the UK's digital clusters

Mapping out where the UK's leading tech clusters are based and what each one specialises in.

Microsoft to shut London Skype office putting 220 jobs at risk

Tech giant Microsoft is set to close the London office of its Skype subsidiary with the potential loss of 220 jobs.

Successful UK technology firms have 'sold out too early'

One of the UK's leading fund managers, Neil Woodford, says that successful UK technology firms have 'sold out too early'.

Tech Talent: British tech company boss shares his vision

Herman Narula, founder and chief executive of British tech start-up company Improbable, sets out his roadmap for UK tech success.

Source: BBC News - Business

BBC News - Business

CEO Secrets: Levi Roots shares his tips for success

Levi Roots, the food entrepreneur famous for his sauce, offers the business advice he wishes he had been given when he started out.

South African shops salvaging 'expired' goods

The Cape Town supermarket owner selling food past its "sell-by" date.

What if Yahoo hackers have my details?

The BBC's technology reporter Chris Foxx explains how you can stay safe following the Yahoo hack.

South Africa's bittersweet sugar tax

The impending sugar tax in South Africa is causing concern in the soft drinks industry.

The costs and challenges of an ageing population

Being positive may be key to successful ageing but the economic challenge of an ageing population is a huge global predicament.

Yahoo breach: Troy Hunt gives tips to protect yourself

Security expert Troy Hunt discusses the scale of the Yahoo breach and what steps its users should take to protect their data.

Brexit talks 'probably early 2017'

Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson has said that formal negotiations for Britain to Leave the European Union will "probably" begin in early 2017.

New fivers sell for hundreds of pounds

Why are people paying hundreds of pounds for the new plastic £5 note?

Why don't UK tech firms lead the world?

Are the Americans just more determined when it comes to producing world-beating tech firms?

US Treasury Secretary unhappy with EU’s Apple tax order

The US Treasury Secretary Jack Lew told the BBC that it is unacceptable for the European Union to grab revenue intended for US coffers with the Apple ruling.

Lorry-themed condoms tackle India HIV

It is estimated two million Indian lorry drivers regularly use prostitutes - but barely 10% of them are using condoms. To help raise awareness, lorry-themed condoms are being sold.

Brits befuddled by who or what is Tim Hortons

Famed for its coffee and doughnuts, Tim Hortons is an institution in Canada. Now the chain is expanding to the UK - but British consumers have a lot to learn.

How do you sell the fastest sports car in the world?

How do you sell the world's fastest, and one of its most expensive cars, at a time when people are tightening their purse strings?

Tech Talent: British tech company boss shares his vision

Herman Narula, founder and chief executive of British tech start-up company Improbable, sets out his roadmap for UK tech success.

Elizabeth Warren mauls 'gutless' Wells Fargo boss

Elizabeth Warren mauls 'gutless' Wells Fargo boss

Sweden is using tax incentives to encourage repairs

Sweden hopes to encourage people to repair broken goods by using tax incentives.

On board an $11m luxury yacht

BBC Business presenter Aaron Heslehurst shows us around a Princess M Class vessel at the Southampton Boat Show, which has 37 miles of cabling, and costs $50,000 to fill with fuel.

Mike Ashley: 'I fly to work by helicopter'

Sports Direct boss Mike Ashley tells the BBC that he flies to work by helicopter.

Investing in $1bn tech firms - US vs UK

Chief executive of the start-up Chessable, David Kramaley, gives his views on why the US has so many more $1bn tech firms than the UK.

Brexit effect on prices of flights from UK to Europe

There were warnings that leaving the EU might affect the cost of cheap flights to Europe.

The Thai e-commerce firm trying to speed up deliveries

Bangkok-based aCommerce is trying to speed up deliveries in southeast Asia.

Tech Talent: 'I would turn down £1bn for my company'

TransferWise co-founder Taavet Hinrikus says he would turn down £1bn for his company

Tech Talent: Moneybox founder on ambition in the UK

Ben Stanway, founder of the Moneybox app, talks about the difference between the UK and US when it comes to business ambition.

Successful UK technology firms have 'sold out too early'

One of the UK's leading fund managers, Neil Woodford, says that successful UK technology firms have 'sold out too early'.

CEO Secrets: Skyscanner boss reveals his business tips

Gareth Williams, co-founder of travel search engine Skyscanner, offers the business advice he wishes he had been given when he started out.

Car testing: How to perform a 'corkscrew'

BBC News visits a car test centre that has invested in new kit to flip over vehicles at speed.

Pizza, dogs and Bake Off: what Mark Carney really likes

Bank of England governor Mark Carney answers quick-fire questions from BBC School Reporters about his likes and dislikes.

Singapore F1 Grand Prix roars on despite Zika fears

Singapore is hosting the Formula 1 Grand Prix for a ninth year amid concerns about a Zika outbreak and recently foiled terror plot.

Kenya's mobile-controlled greenhouses

The band of entrepreneurs who believe pairing farming with technology could secure the future of Kenya's agricultural economy.

The gig economy: Opportunity or threat?

Colm O'Regan looks at the growing number of people undertaking temporary, short-term work.

Indian firms hit by Hanjin bankruptcy

Indian exporters that used Hanjin Shipping's vessels to send goods around the world are concerned about stranded cargo and shipping competition.

'Terrified' reporter Katy Watson eats a worm

BBC reporter Katy Watson eats a worm in Mexico - and is surprised by how it tastes.

Hinkley Point: Why do we need a new nuclear power plant?

The BBC's Simon Jack explains why we need a new nuclear power station.

Turning a love of travel and shopping into money

Renee Lodens turned her favourite hobbies - travel and shopping - into a thriving business, Travelshopa

UK should leave EU single market, says James Dyson

James Dyson tells the BBC's Kamal Ahmed why he isn't concerned about Britain's relationship with the rest of the EU following the country's decision to leave the union.

Hike Messenger: Can India's answer to WhatsApp make money?

Can India's Hike Messenger fulfil its potential and make money? Shilpa Kannan has a chat with the app's founder, Kavin Mittal, to find out.

Could the US ease Myanmar sanctions following Suu Kyi visit?

Could the US ease Myanmar sanctions following Aung San Suu Kyi's visit?

Putting a plastic fiver to the test

The BBC's Simon Gompertz puts the new plastic five pound note to the test.

Ford wants to remove the steering wheel

The BBC'’s Michelle Fleury takes a ride in one of Ford's prototype self-driving cars.

Mother accused of marriage to dead man

A teenage mother had her child tax credits stopped after she was wrongly registered as being married to a dead 74-year-old man, the BBC learns.

Seaweed farmers in Indonesia sue in major oil spill case

Indonesian seaweed farmers launch a class action lawsuit demanding compensation for the effects of Australia's worst oil spill.

Tanzania levies VAT on tourism and banking sectors

Safari operators and banks in Tanzania are being asked to stump-up value added tax.

Frances O'Grady on working with PM over worker's rights

Frances O'Grady on zero hours contracts, rest breaks and sick pay.

CEO Secrets: Indiegogo co-founder reveals her business advice

Danae Ringelmann, co-founder of Indiegogo, offers the business advice she wishes she had been given when she started out.

Why are 80% of Ugandans snubbing local clothing brands?

A booming second-hand clothing market in Uganda is causing controversy.

Wetherspoon boss says UK does not need an EU trade deal

The chairman of JD Wetherspoon pub chain, Tim Martin, has said that the UK does not need to negotiate a trade deal with the European Union.

Can our economics editor beat the clock?

The BBC's economics editor Kamal Ahmed has been in Switzerland to learn what the non-EU country can teach the UK during Brexit negotiations.

Zambia's unorthodox fishermen catch the rising tide

Demand for fish in Zambia is high but unorthodox fishing methods are also on the rise.

Searching for a stranded Hanjin ship

The BBC’s Sharanjit Leyl goes in search of one of Hanjin Shipping's vessels, which has been stranded since the firm filed for bankruptcy protection last week.

Indonesia's disabled motorbike taxi service

One man in Indonesia's city of Yogyakarta - a popular tourist destination - has launched a motorbike taxi service for people with a disability.

Stephen Fry: 'Without tax, civilisation falters'

In the wake of a fresh row over Apple's European tax payments, actor and broadcaster Stephen Fry says he has "no patience" with large firms paying "minuscule rates of taxation".

Sony PS4 Pro: Is this a game changer?

Sony has announced a more powerful version of its PlayStation 4 console at an event in New York.

Rio 2016 Paralympics: Will the Games be a success?

After weeks wrought with emotion the Rio 2016 Paralympics are under way with 4,350 athletes taking part. The event will cost $2.1bn, just a fifth of last month's Olympics.

Will the iPhone 7 boost Apple's fortunes?

Apple unveils the iPhone 7 at a time its share price is under pressure and its market share has been falling.

Mark Carney: 'I'm absolutely serene about the comments made'

Bank of England governor Mark Carney says he is "absolutely serene" about the Bank's preparations for the impact from the Brexit vote.

Mike Ashley unloads wad of £50 notes

Sports Direct founder Mike Ashley unloads a wad of £50 notes when he goes through security at the company's Shirebrook warehouse on a media tour.

Mike Ashley: 'We should be given time'

Sports Direct founder Mike Ashley says he and chairman Keith Hellawell should be given time to improve things at the business.

The explosive chemistry that cleans up your car exhaust

Platinum helps burn up nasty gases in your car exhaust. Prof Andrea Sella demonstrates this explosive chemistry of catalysis.

'Not much hope' for Jenny to buy home

The Labour leader challenges the PM on people being able to afford to buy houses.

The welcome wedding crashers

Tourists are paying to be guests at weddings in India - but does it make a couple's big day any less special?

Gender pay gap: 'I was bullied over equal pay request'

Women discuss their experiences of asking for equal pay.

Sports Direct chairman should 'step down'

A shareholder in Sports Direct says investors do not plan to change their vote of no confidence in Sports Direct chairman Keith Hellawell.

F1 engineer makes 'first flat-pack truck'

Acclaimed F1 designer Gordon Murray makes the world's first flat-pack vehicle - and says it's his proudest achievement yet.

John Lewis: Inside a modern distribution centre

BBC News takes a look inside a new distribution centre opened by the John Lewis group in Milton Keynes.

Women 'do ask, just don't get' pay rises

Women are just as pushy as men when it comes to asking for pay rises. They're just less likely to get them, according to new research.

TPP? RCEP? Trade jargon explained

Karishma Vaswani explains some of the trade deals - and the jargon behind them - that will be discussed at the Asean summit this week.

From postman to cocoa farmer

Filipino farmer Grover Rosit started growing cocoa more than a decade ago - and has since struck gold, quitting his old job and sending all his kids to college.

CEO Secrets: IT boss wants you to take 'moon shots'

Stephen Kelly, CEO of the Sage Group, offers the business advice he wishes he had been given when he started out.

Brexit sparks foreign property spree in London

The fall in the value of the pound has triggered a spending spree in London's property market from foreign investors.

G20 summit: 'China cannot go it alone' on world economy

China is hosting the G20 summit where it hopes to increase its say in the global economy, but a senior Chinese banker says it knows "dominance will not create a great leader".

Lincolnshire farmer: 'We could not operate without migrants'

Some hope that leaving the European Union will restrict the number of migrants coming to Britain. But what might that mean for the UK's rural economy?

North Shields trawlerman: 'No boats left to catch fish'

British trawlermen have long accused EU fishing quotas of decimating the fishing industry in the North Sea and the Channel. But what do they hope the government will replace them with?

Dialing up cheap data in India

Reliance is offering Indian smartphone users what it says is some of the cheapest mobile data in the world.

Kenya caps the cost of bank loans

In Kenya the cost of borrowing has come down because the government has passed a law limiting how much banks can charge customers for loans.

Aslef says Southern owners should 'prop up' loss making parts

Train drivers union, Aslef, says the Go-Ahead rail group should cross-subsidise to "prop up" the loss making parts of the business.

Will the Federal Reserve raise US interest rates?

Could the US central bank, the Federal Reserve, raise interest rates this month? It may well depend on the August jobs figures.

Smart home tech on show in Berlin

The tech industry's biggest names reveal their latest smart home gadgets at this year's IFA consumer tech show in Berlin.

Tim Cook: 'Apple hasn't done anything wrong'

Apple chief executive Tim Cook says the European Commission ruling on Apple's taxes is "maddening" and "disappointing".

Cash calendar - tips for September

Buying a car and travelling by train can be considerably cheaper if you consider a few simple tips, an advice service says.

'I was sacked for being pregnant'

Joeli Brearley explains how her employers, a charity, left her a voicemail telling her she was sacked after she told them she was four months pregnant.

Apple tax move praised by Nobel winner

Nobel Prize winner Joseph Stiglitz praises the EU on Apple's tax bill

India's rural areas are counting on a good monsoon season

A good monsoon season across India is crucial to the economy and there are hopes rural farmers will see their incomes lifted this year.

Nigeria in recession: How the country got here

Find out why figures released today show that Nigeria is officially in recession for the first time in more than a decade.

Shenzhen's start up scene: from ski sensors to worm farms

Shenzhen is famous for making electronics, but it's also become a popular spot for start-ups from all over the world.

Apple tax: Level playing field fair, says EU

Margrethe Vestager, the European Commissioner for Competition, says it is 'only fair' that there should be a 'level playing field' where all companies pay their tax.

Indian lesbian romance film turns to internet for funding

Indian lesbian romance film 'The Other Love Story' takes on a taboo topic and turns to the internet for funding.

The 88-year-old sari company

Lavanya Nalli tells the story of her family's sari business in Chennai - and her ambitions for its expansion.

The last BHS stores close their doors

The last BHS stores are set to close for the final time after 88 years on the high Street. Joe Lynam reports.

CEO Secrets: Airbnb co-founder shares tips for success

Nathan Blecharczyk, one of the co-founders of Airbnb, offers the business advice he wishes he had been given when he started out.

What happens when you let a dog in the studio...

James Davidson, co-founder of pet food company Tails.com, talks to Business Live - but his dog Monty steals the show.

Building a community restaurant in Botswana

Despite the often frustrating employment situation for young Botswanans, one young entrepreneur is ploughing ahead while remaining thoroughly rooted in his community.

BHS: Inside a 'ghost store' in Edinburgh

BBC News takes a look around a former BHS flagship store on Edinburgh's Princes Street, empty now that the chain has ceased trading.

Driverless taxis roam Singapore streets

Driverless taxis are being tested on the streets of Singapore for the first time.

Can foreign car makers succeed in India?

After a slow few years for India's car market, sales are powering ahead. But how about foreign car companies there?

Should Botswana break its reliance on diamonds?

Diamonds have helped Botswana's economy over the past 50 years. But now some people are saying that the stones don't hold the same promise for the future.

Thomas Cook: '1.8m customers still want to go to Turkey'

The boss of Thomas Cook tells the BBC it's still safe to go on holiday to Turkey, according to government advice, and says the Brexit vote hasn't affected business.

North Korea promotes local brew at first beer festival

North Korea is holding its first beer festival to promote its domestic brew Taedonggang.

'My job is to inspire people to tidy up'

Giving up your high-flying job as a lawyer in Shanghai to become a professional home organiser may be an unusual choice for many, but that's exactly what Han Yien did.

Buses battle it out on test track

BBC News visits an annual bus competition designed to test handling and fuel efficiency, which helps a UK bus group choose the next generation of vehicles.

Source: BBC News - Business

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