Business news

BBC News - Business

Cash 'lives on' after 50 years of ATMs

Bank of England chief cashier says all future plans include the use of cash despite new technology.

Grenfell Tower: Cladding firm ends global sales for tower blocks

The cladding was used on Grenfell Tower, where at least 79 are feared to have died in a fire.

SpaceX completes launch and landing double bill

The US rocket company makes two launches in just over 24 hours.

UK safety standards are 'cut to the bone', expert says

Austerity forces councils to prioritise other services, says the Chartered Trading Standards Institute.

Scottish areas worst for broadband speeds, says Which?

The slowest speeds in the UK are experienced in three Scottish local authority areas, Which? says.

Shares in Grenfell cladding maker sink

Arconic falls 6% after saying it will stop selling Reynobond PE cladding for use in high-rises.

Holland & Barrett sold for £1.8bn to Russian billionaire

Russian billionaire Mikhail Fridman buys 1,300-store chain from its private equity owner Carlyle.

Co-operative Bank no longer up for sale

The bank says it expects to make a further announcement on fund-raising plans to safeguard its future.

Lord Adonis: Brexit delay over Heathrow must end

Political uncertainty must not hold up Heathrow airport plans, says the top infrastructure adviser.

Growth in personal debt is slowing, says BBA

The annual rise in loan, card and overdraft borrowing is slowing, but saving levels are at a six-year low.

Gmail to end ad-targeting email scans

Privacy groups cautiously welcome Google's pledge to end scans of Gmail messages to personalise ads.

Takata: Airbag-maker files for bankruptcy

Japanese firm faces billions of dollars of liabilities linked to the biggest ever automotive recall.

Italy forced to bail out two more banks for 5.2bn euros

Rome will spend at least 5.2bn euros to rescue Banca Popolare di Vicenza and Veneto Banca.

Crown Resorts staff jailed for enticing Chinese gamblers

Three Australian Crown Resorts employees broke the law by enticing Chinese high-rollers to casinos.

The first cash machine came into use 50 years ago today

It is 50 years to the day that the first cash machine came into use. How has it changed over the years?

£100m from West to clean up Russian nuclear base

Western nations are giving Russia nearly £100m to clear up nuclear waste at Andreyeva Bay, a contaminated Cold War submarine base.

'The government's approach to Brexit will not change'

The government’s approach to Brexit will not change, says the cabinet minister for international trade.

CEO Secrets: Bumble founder says don't take yourself too seriously

Bumble dating app CEO Whitney Wolfe says don't take yourself too seriously.

How I stayed in business during Asian Financial Crisis

Thai businessman Wasan Benz Thonglor nearly lost everything in the 1997 Asia Financial Crisis.

Brexit: Tory MP Leadsom says broadcasters should be patriotic

Coverage of Brexit could be more "helpful", Tory MP Andrea Leadsom tells Newsnight's Emily Maitlis.

The start-ups plugging the hole in Zimbabwe's economy

Against all the odds, some entrepreneurs in Zimbabwe are running successful small businesses.

How safe is your internet router?

Virgin Media is warning its customers to change the password on their internet routers. A Which? investigation found its Super Hub 2 router is vulnerable to hackers.

Ant power

The drive to find more sustainable transport fuels has been given a boost by some Dutch students.

A High Street star?

The Russian billionaire buying the health food chain said he wanted to invest in future stars of the High Street. Does Holland & Barrett fit the bill?

‘I love doing battle’

How hard-hitting Irish-American entrepreneur David McCourt made his fortune in TV and telecoms.

Tricky trade-off

If rules are too strict, good ideas take too long to spread, but lax regulation risks no innovation.

Big hitters

The Women's Cricket World Cup gets under way, on a mission to grow as a sport and a business

One year on

What do economists and businesses think of the aftermath of the Brexit vote, and what do they think the future holds?

Better prospects

What impact is China's Belt and Road initiative, aimed at boosting trade links, having in Kazakhstan?

'I lost my eye'

About two billion people have no insurance, but "pay-by-mobile" policies are growing in popularity.

'There's no judgement'

The new generation of dance workouts aiming to be less formal and more enjoyable.

Energy revolution

China consumes more electricity than any other country but is also the world's biggest solar energy producer.

Paris Airshow: eight takeaways from the major aerospace event

From breaking the sound barrier to sales battles: eight things we learned at the Paris Airshow.

A hot issue

South Africa exports almost half of the apples it grows, but rising temperatures are hitting production.

Hidden problem

Despite international pledges, many of the world's poorest children do not get a chance to go to school.

Philippines outsourcing

Does US protectionism and artificial intelligence threaten the Philippine's outsourcing industry?

Lightning strike

While the F-35 has been one of the main attractions at the Paris Airshow, here we've also picked out some of the other highlights of this week's show.

Grand theft auto

Connected cars are becoming the norm, but how secure are they and how safe is our personal data?

Diva of divorce

How Ayesha Vardag has became one of the world's most in demand divorce lawyers.

Gaming gift

From Spacewar! to Pokemon Go, video games have created jobs, made money and driven technology forward.

Paris Airshow

As the Paris Airshow gets under way, the BBC's Theo Leggett says few expect to see big orders for airliners.

Reality Check

Is the government allowed to requisition homes to provide emergency housing?

Home hijack

A security weakness in Gary Berman's home network may have lost him a $400,000 contract.

Greek gifts

As eurozone finance ministers hold talks on Greece, Reality Check looks at the bailouts it has received.

Hard done dads?

With Father's Day taking place on Sunday in more than 70 countries, why does it still trail so far behind Mother's Day?

Future fuel

How can cities improve air quality with cleaner fuels?

Mass surveillance

BBC Arabic found the sales included decryption software that could be used against the West.

Pay more, wait longer

Burgers used to be fast and cheap but what's driving the success of a different type of patty?

Tough school?

Top graduates in Afghanistan are being urged to spend two years as school teachers.

Precious metals

Some of the metals needed to make many of our tech gadgets are in short supply. Could recycling help?

Trade options

What is the difference between a free trade area, a single market and a customs union?

Food for thought

How popular snack food business Graze was successfully grown by its chief executive Anthony Fletcher.

Trading tool

The earliest known script was a tool developed to help run the economy.

Taming the giants

Five tech giants increasingly dominate the US and global economies. But what, if anything, should be done about it?

Qatar and the UK

How Qatar spent £35bn investing in everything from Claridge's to the Milford Haven LNG terminal.

Easy charm

The BBC's Elizabeth Hotson attends a charisma master class as she explores whether you can teach someone to become more charismatic.

How many boxes?

When Beyonce, Lady Gaga, U2 and the Rolling Stones go on tour, they all depend on one London firm to get them onstage.

Baby bytes

Hundreds of apps give breastfeeding and baby advice to new mums, but are they any good?

Cold revolution

Initially invented for the printing industry, the technology has transformed the way we live and work.

Telegram

The Islamic State group relies on encrypted messaging app Telegram to spread its message digitally.

Taking his own path

How Adrian Fisher became a professional maze designer, creating more than 700 mazes across 32 countries.

Splendid isolation?

Residents of the new London City Island live less than 30 minutes away from central London.

From videos to vlogs

In the 1980s, Jane Fonda sold millions of workout videos. Now anyone can be an online fitness guru.

Worked to death

Japan has some of the world's longest working hours, and some young Japanese are literally working themselves to death.

Climate clash

President Trump ditches the Paris accord, but almost all big firms say pulling out is an error.

Power surge?

BA's explanation for its systems' meltdown at the weekend has left many scratching their heads.

Older age

Paying for social care has figured highly in the election. But other issues are not discussed.

Selling up or selling out?

Can independent brands keep to their core beliefs after selling up to a bigger firm or bringing investors on board?

Juice wars

Changing tastes are putting orange juice's place on the breakfast table in jeopardy.

Feeding the kitty

The British and Irish Lions are one of the biggest sporting names in rugby union, and they are also one of its premier brands.

Just the job?

Ever had a job interview that seemed to have nothing to do with your ability to do the job?

Source: BBC News - Business

BBC News - Business

The first cash machine came into use 50 years ago today

It is 50 years to the day that the first cash machine came into use. How has it changed over the years?

£100m from West to clean up Russian nuclear base

Western nations are giving Russia nearly £100m to clear up nuclear waste at Andreyeva Bay, a contaminated Cold War submarine base.

'The government's approach to Brexit will not change'

The government’s approach to Brexit will not change, says the cabinet minister for international trade.

CEO Secrets: Bumble founder says don't take yourself too seriously

Bumble dating app CEO Whitney Wolfe says don't take yourself too seriously.

How I stayed in business during Asian Financial Crisis

Thai businessman Wasan Benz Thonglor nearly lost everything in the 1997 Asia Financial Crisis.

Brexit: Tory MP Leadsom says broadcasters should be patriotic

Coverage of Brexit could be more "helpful", Tory MP Andrea Leadsom tells Newsnight's Emily Maitlis.

The start-ups plugging the hole in Zimbabwe's economy

Against all the odds, some entrepreneurs in Zimbabwe are running successful small businesses.

How safe is your internet router?

Virgin Media is warning its customers to change the password on their internet routers. A Which? investigation found its Super Hub 2 router is vulnerable to hackers.

London's temporary African-inspired architecture

Diebedo Francis Kere is the 17th architect to design a temporary pavilion in the grounds of London's Hyde Park.

How Velcro became a million dollar idea

The BBC's Aaron Heslehurst tells how Velcro was invented after a walk in a wood.

Premier Inn urgently reviews cladding

The chain says three hotels are affected - but the cladding is 'less flammable' than Grenfell Tower.

Togo's 'voodoo vacations'

Traditional voodoo ceremonies are attracting tourists to the small West African nation of Togo.

Shark attacks threaten Reunion Island tourist trade

Shark attacks on surfers and swimmers around Reunion island have seriously affected local businesses.

Geylang Ramadan bazaar: Singapore's new hipster haunt

But are the cool new snacks on sale at the traditional Geylang bazaar in the spirit of the season?

'The weirdest city in the world?'

The BBC's Karishma Vaswani goes to check out Astana in Kazakhstan.

OOCL Hong Kong: Felixstowe Port welcomes 'World's biggest ship'

The OOCL Hong Kong made her first port of call in Europe at Felixstowe in Suffolk.

Fruit farm: 'One Brit applied in five years'

Zoe Conway spoke to managers in the fruit industry who are struggling to recruit workers

Paris Airshow: Preparing to land on the Moon

The BBC's Theo Leggett shows us round Astrobotic's lunar lander, on display at the Paris Airshow.

Raytheon: 'There's a broad range of threats'

John Harris, CEO of missile-maker Raytheon International, says they now also focus heavily on cyber security.

Aadhar: Why is India's biometric scheme so controversial?

More than a billion biometric cards have been issued, but the scheme is deeply controversial.

Alibaba boss Jack Ma arrives in US

The boss of China's biggest e-commerce company says small firms could soon benefit from globalisation.

Making aircraft parts with 3D printing

Aircraft manufacturers are increasingly using 3D printing to make components more cost effectively, says the BBC's Theo Leggett.

Building a supersonic successor to Concorde

Boom Supersonic boss Blake Scholl says his successor to Concord will be commercially viable.

Flying car: One way to beat traffic

The BBC's Theo Leggett shows us around a new flying car, which is on display at the Paris Airshow.

Mark Carney: UK wage growth 'anaemic'

The time for a rise in UK interest rates is not now, says Bank of England governor Mark Carney.

Rolls-Royce: Brexit uncertainty is an issue

Warren East, boss of engineering giant Rolls-Royce, says that the further the UK gets from its current relationship with the rest of the EU "the harder it's going to be".

Brexit talks: Davis 'determined optimist' after day one

UK Brexit Secretary David Davis and EU Chief Negotiator Michel Barnier in Brussels give their thoughts.

Should we be able to dress down for work in the heat wave?

The TUC is calling on employers to let staff dress more casually during the current heat wave. What do Britain's office workers have to say?

Boeing sees long term market growth

Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg says there is rising demand for airliners as more of us fly each year.

Would you go into business with your bestie?

Best friends Stephanie Johnson and Kristina Komlosiova are joint CEOs of their catering company.

Aerospace giants to compete at Paris Air Show

Competition is fierce ahead of one of the aerospace industry's most important events, with sales expected to be much lower than in recent years.

Keir Starmer: 'Customs union should be left on the table'

Labour's Sir Keir Starmer says that it could be possible for the UK to remain a member of the customs union after it leaves the EU.

Why is Amazon buying Whole Foods?

The $13.7bn (£10.7bn) deal marks Amazon's biggest push yet into traditional retailing.

Prince Andrew: Brexit glass half full

While businesses face a period of upheaval, there are opportunities for international trade post-Brexit, Prince Andrew tells the BBC's Sharanjit Leyl.

How the Rubik's Cube became a million dollar idea

BBC business presenter Aaron Heslehurst explains how the Rubik's Cube became a million dollar idea.

Poor harvest causes maize shortages in Kenya

Consumers are finding it hard to buy maize and Kenyan farmers are blaming the government.

Lake Tanganyika hit by climate change and over-fishing

Livelihoods are under threat as Lake Tanganyika suffers from the effects of climate change, over-fishing and deforestation.

EU citizens celebrate the end of roaming fees

Mobile users celebrate the abolition of mobile roaming charges within the European Union.

UK unemployment is at record low but wages aren't rising

The BBC's Andy Verity runs through the latest figures on jobs and unemployment.

Are Trump's US economy boasts correct?

The US president takes the credit for job creation, a stock market boom and falling unemployment. Really?

Would you rent used baby clothes?

Vigga Svensson wants Danish parents to rent used baby clothes, to save the planet.

What business wants from Brexit

What do businesses want from Brexit? Here are the views of the bosses of two leading British brands

Earnings not 'Diddy' for top celebrities

How much money do you think Sean 'Diddy' Combs earned this year?

CEO Secrets: Cath Kidston says 'you can't do everything'

Designer and entrepreneur Cath Kidston says don't expect to be able to do everything in business.

Man asks Twitch users to pick shares for $50,000 portfolio

Twitch viewers can vote on stocks and those with the most votes are automatically purchased.

How election outcome shocked the City

BBC business editor Simon Jack explains how the election outcome caught financial markets by surprise and affected the pound.

10-year-old app maker's plan: Change world, become turtle

Yuma Soerianto, a 10-year-old app developer from Melbourne, Australia, was the youngest attendee at Apple's developers' conference this week.

Mozambique silversmiths face modern competition

In Mozambique, Ibo island has been home to generations of silversmiths who hand-forge their wares, but now this trade is at risk.

How can Africa's electricity problem be solved?

Half a billion people in Africa currently live without electricity.

US President Trump sued over business connections

The case alleges he is violating the US constitution by doing business with foreign governments.

Finally, a place for your helicopter at sea

If you're a billionaire super yacht owner there's often just one problem: where do you put a helicopter?

Welcome to the Museum of Failure

Remembering some of the big name inventions that weren't a big success.

Source: BBC News - Business

Business News