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BBC News - Business

Ford announces £2,000 scrappage scheme for pre-2010 cars

The car maker is offering £2,000 off a new car in a scheme it says will have "an immediate effect" on air quality.

Johnson & Johnson faces $417m payout in latest talc case

The payout - to a woman who developed ovarian cancer - is the largest award so far against the firm.

Would you live in a home the size of a Tube carriage?

The number of properties little bigger than a budget hotel room has soared, says Which?

UK toys celebrated on Royal Mail stamps

The set of 10 stamps will feature UK-made toys from the past 100 years, including Sindy and Meccano.

Co-operative Group's stake in Co-op bank to fall to 1%

Shareholders back a £700m rescue deal that will cut the Co-op Group's stake in the Co-op Bank.

China's Great Wall eyes Fiat Chrysler bid

The Chinese SUV maker says it is interested in buying the Jeep owner, but no approach has been made.

Cambridge University Press reverses China censorship move

Cambridge University Press restores access to sensitive China stories after academics protest.

VW to relaunch Kombi van as electric vehicle

The famous van is set to return in modern electric form, five years after production finally ended.

Debit and credit card use accelerates

Concerns have been raised about the level of personal debt, as consumers spend on plastic.

Apple's 'hidden' job ad found online

The advertisement for "a talented engineer" begins with the welcome: "Hey there! You found us."

Total and Maersk agree £5.8bn deal

It would see French firm Total take control Denmark's Maersk's assets in the UK sector of the North Sea.

Musk warns of 'killer robot' arms race

A letter to the UN warns the world is getting closer to a dangerous "third revolution in warfare".

Ministers 'must act on faulty white goods fire risk'

In a letter to Theresa May, the London Fire Brigade and others say white goods must be made safer.

Crawford Falconer takes up post as UK's top trade negotiator

Crawford Falconer is expected to "build bridges" on trade before Brexit is formally agreed.

FTSE chief executives' median pay 'down almost 20%'

Deloitte says its annual survey of executive pay suggests policies to limit bosses' pay are working.

FTSE 100 dips as finance stocks slump

The benchmark share index finishes slightly lower after a choppy day of trading.

Qantas chief to campaign for Australia same-sex marriage

Alan Joyce, who was once struck with a pie over his support, will "be active" in Australia's debate.

Parents on low incomes 'can't afford basics'

Incomes are too low to provide children with 'no-frills' essentials, says Child Poverty Action Group.

Company bosses 'lack cyber-attack training'

A government survey finds one in 10 businesses questioned have no plan to deal with hacking.

How to cash in on a solar eclipse

A total solar eclipse is visible across the US on Monday for the first time in nearly a century.

'I couldn't tell my parents I had started a business'

Shoko Takahashi set up bio-tech firm Gene Quest, but didn't feel able to tell her parents for six months that she had launched her own business.

How the microwave oven became a million dollar idea

The BBC's Aaron Heslehurst explains how the microwave oven became a million dollar idea.

Black ownership rules polarise S African mining sector

Will the South African government's attempt at redressing inequalities in the mining industry actually destroy it?

Bottling the sea's 'healing qualities'

To satisfy a growing demand, a company in South Africa is extracting, bottling and selling sea water.

Nokia 8 smartphone takes 'bothie' videos

The phone streams video from its front and rear cameras at the same time to Facebook or YouTube .

'We can't get the skilled staff'

Stuart Gardner, the boss of British motorbike maker Norton, says that a shortage of skilled employees is holding his firm back.

Will you ever be able to retire?

With people living longer and saving less, are we living through the death of retirement?

The city that just can't stop growing

Thirty years from now the population of Nigeria will have doubled. How can Lagos - Africa's largest city - cope with its spiralling numbers?

Wrestling bids to boost interest in China

Is it real or is it fake? The fans don't care in the US, and the WWE hopes they won't in China.

Righting wrongs

Food firm Dr Oetker, says others should follow it and give back art they own that was looted by the Nazis from Jewish owners.

Digital life after death?

Start-ups are beginning to swoop in on the death and funerals sector to shake up a staid industry.

Piece of cake

How Cleusa Maria went from being a child farm worker to running one of Brazil's most popular bakery chains.

Pawnbrokers' secrets

Only 4% of the UK's adult population - and more women than men - now use a pawnbroker to get a loan.

Long trek

The average UK shoe size of men and women has gone up by two sizes since the 1970s - but women's footwear makers have not kept up.

Brexit bounce?

The UK's tourism industry reports a big rise in visitor numbers, helped by the weaker pound making the country a more affordable place to holiday.

Cyber pirates

Weak defences are leaving cargo vessels vulnerable to cyber-attacks, say experts.

Contactless charity

Can contactless technologies help charities raise more money?

What's in a name?

China's ban on names such as "scared of wife" or "prehistoric powers" comes after a crackdown on what Beijing regards as strange buildings.

Germany's 'hidden champions'

Exploring the small and medium-sized firms that are the backbone of Germany's economy.

King's ransom

Why passing away has done little to deaden the commercial appeal of musical legends like Elvis and their entrepreneurial super fans.

Changing formats

Hit TV shows are now bought and adapted for different countries around the world in an industry worth billions.

The right note?

Why hi-resolution sites are music to the ears of fans who want the best possible sound.

Have it your way

Entrepreneur Lapo Elkann explains how his firm is enticing the rich by customising cars, yachts and private jets.

Cathedrals of commerce

These "cathedrals of commerce" were democratic spaces that, some say, helped emancipate women.

Bouncing back

How Giles Fuchs went from failing his A-levels to becoming a very wealthy property and offices boss.

Trade zone North America

In August, Canada, the US and Mexico will sit down to begin to renegotiate Nafta.

Generation wanderlust

How travel companies are trying hard to target the lucrative "selfie-generation".

Wired weeding

A smartphone app can tell you whether Japanese knotweed is anywhere near where you live.

Cardboard connoisseur

It has often been written off - but sales suggest bag-in-box wine is surging in popularity.

'Business as usual'

Businesses in Manchester have been impacted by a fall in visitor numbers in the aftermath of the bomb attack in May, but they are optimistic of a full recovery.

Gloves off

Can the world's most popular mixed martial arts brand finally succeed in conquering the continent?

Kings of the road

The number of ice cream vans has been falling, but a crop of firms are determined to keep the industry alive.

Source: BBC News - Business

BBC News - Business

How to cash in on a solar eclipse

A total solar eclipse is visible across the US on Monday for the first time in nearly a century.

'I couldn't tell my parents I had started a business'

Shoko Takahashi set up bio-tech firm Gene Quest, but didn't feel able to tell her parents for six months that she had launched her own business.

How the microwave oven became a million dollar idea

The BBC's Aaron Heslehurst explains how the microwave oven became a million dollar idea.

Black ownership rules polarise S African mining sector

Will the South African government's attempt at redressing inequalities in the mining industry actually destroy it?

Bottling the sea's 'healing qualities'

To satisfy a growing demand, a company in South Africa is extracting, bottling and selling sea water.

Nokia 8 smartphone takes 'bothie' videos

The phone streams video from its front and rear cameras at the same time to Facebook or YouTube .

'We can't get the skilled staff'

Stuart Gardner, the boss of British motorbike maker Norton, says that a shortage of skilled employees is holding his firm back.

Will you ever be able to retire?

With people living longer and saving less, are we living through the death of retirement?

Source: BBC News - Business

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