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BBC News - Business

Is now the time to raise interest rates?

With the economy on an uncertain footing, but inflation crushing wage growth, should rates rise now?

Police conduct inquiries into Royal Bank of Scotland unit

Officers are looking into a division of the bank set up to help failing firms, the BBC understands.

'Huge business rate rise' for small firms

Inflation-busting increases are looming for thousands of shops in England, says research firm CVS.

Tenants 'unfairly miss out on credit'

Mortgage applicants are unable to rely on rent payment history as proof that they can afford a home loan.

BMW headquarters searched by EU investigators

EU investigators are looking into allegations of a cartel involving BMW and four other German car giants.

Government borrowing at lowest September level for 10 years

The figures were the third straight month in which UK public finances were better than analysts forecast.

Rail firms 'consider' railcard for 26 to 30-year-olds

It's thought one train company will begin trials of the new railcard in December

Nissan halts production in Japan over inspection concerns

The firm recalled 1.2 million cars in Japan because uncertified technicians performed final checks.

Kobe Steel uncovers more evidence of quality mistakes

The Japanese steel giant says some employees did not report evidence to an internal investigation.

New Great Western Railway trains fixed after software upgrade

Four trains were removed from service on Wednesday due to glitches such as leaking air-con units.

General Electric cuts profit outlook ahead of turnaround plan

The industrial giant also posts a quarterly loss ahead of the unveiling of a restructuring plan.

Childcare costs rise up to seven times faster than wages

With childcare costs rising seven times faster than wages, mums say going to work is "absolutely pointless".

Mobile companies overcharging customers after contracts end

The UK government said the firms needed to inform customers when they had paid for their handsets.

InterContinental Hotels sales boosted by Europe tourism

InterContinental Hotels Group's revenue rises as tourists return to key markets after terror attacks.

Bank of England under fire for lack of diversity

The Treasury Committee seeks evidence on the Bank's efforts to improve its gender and ethnic mix.

Defence Secretary says Clyde shipyard's have 'certainty'

Sir Michael Fallon claimed no other industry had as much certainty as shipbuilders on the Clyde.

How the paper clip became a million dollar idea

The BBC's Aaron Heslehurst explains how the paper clip became a million dollar idea and inspired a resistance movement.

Remittances are a 'lifesaver' for many Liberians

Liberia's economy relies heavily on money sent home by family members living abroad.

The app helping people navigating Ghana's nameless streets

A lack of postal addresses in Ghana has prompted authorities to introduce a digital solution.

Universal credit: Tory peer criticises 'insane' wait for payments

Next boss and Tory peer Lord Wolfson says a six-week wait for benefit payments "must be wrong".

How does this look? Be your own virtual make-up artist

French cosmetics chain Sephora is using augmented reality so that customers can try on make-up virtually, before buying it.

Would you eat green satsumas?

Tesco has announced it will start selling green satsumas but would you be willing to eat them?

The 19-year-old millionaire estate agent

Akshay Ruparelia set up his business from his bedroom during his A-level exams.

Putting Canadian wine on the map

How the wines of Canadian winemaker Norman Hardie are winning a growing number of fans around the world.

Australian carmaking runs out of road

The final vehicle left the production line on Friday, in what many consider a symbolic moment.

Black Monday 1987: 'Our jaws hit the desk'

On Black Monday 30 years ago investors were stunned by a global stock markets crash. What's its legacy?

The global shop

Online retailers have a shop window to the world, but how do you handle all those payments?

Fear the deer

Milwaukee is historically famous for its beer and its motorcycles, but now its basketball team is hoping to fly the flag for the US city.

Rubbish dump

A ban on the import of waste in China is about create a major blockage backing up through the global waste disposal system

Wine on the edge

How Canadian winemaker Norman Hardie is able to make award-winning wines, despite winter temperatures so cold it can kill his vines.

Health risks

Health risks and job losses are among the harms many in China face in the push for economic change.

Toughest lessons

A student who faced torture and imprisonment in Syria's civil war is starting her life again at a university in Canada

Sweet success

What's the best way to sell online? And how do you make sure your website really works?

Poison purifiers

The social entrepreneurs innovating a clean water solution for Bangladesh's arsenic poisoning crisis

Strong currency

Paresh Davdra developed his successful money exchange firm from the ground up.

Pipe perfection

Designed in 1775, the S-bend was key to the flushing toilet, and public sanitation as we know it.

Made in Japan

The industrial crisis at Kobe Steel is deepening but some warn it won’t be the last Japanese business scandal.

Racing finances

Formula One teams' costs have soared after rules changes designed to make for closer competition.

No-belle prize

Just 13% of US academic economists are women - and only one has won the Nobel Prize in economics. Why are women so under-represented in the profession?

Pest control

How apps using image recognition are helping farmers identify crop diseases.

Timber travel

A growing number of firms are crafting bikes using wood, but some cyclists remain wary

Location, location, location

Where we are, and where we want to go is at the heart of many of the world's most innovative businesses.

Disney to Pompey

Michael Eisner is using is expertise in the US entertainment industry to turn around Portsmouth FC.

Eat your cup

What solutions would work best to deal with our growing coffee cup waste mountain?

Worst odds

The countries where most girls don't even get to start primary school.

Baby Lifesaver

This Bangladeshi doctor who turned a shampoo bottle into a low-cost lifesaver

Robo shops

Can a wave of disruptive ideas change our shopping habits?

From pillows to concrete

Carbon emissions contribute to global warming, so could tech that removes them from the air slow the process?

Have you been nudged?

Five ways the theory behind this year's Nobel prize for economics may have influenced your behaviour.

Mamma spice

How Munaf Kapadia runs a successful "pop up" restaurant at his family home in Mumbai.

Blue sky thinking

British scientists played a key role in developing radar, which has helped deliver safer skies.

Out of control

Carmakers are increasingly sending vehicle software updates wirelessly, but how risky is this?

Film memorabilia

Some film memorabilia fetches millions at auction, but it can cost nothing to start a collection.

Smells wrong

Could niche perfumes made by artisan houses be the saviour for the struggling fragrance industry?

Royal model

Sheikha Hind provides a modern face for the wealthy, blockaded Gulf state of Qatar.

Trump impact?

International students are increasingly looking outside the US to pursue graduate business education.

Ice men

Meet the engineers who create ice structures in India's far north, to try to solve persistent water shortages.

Close call

5G broadband could be 10 times as fast as 4G and underpin many new technologies of the future.

Out of fashion

From take-off to final grounding, the airline has seen the best and worst of times in the airline industry.

Women on board

There are lots of reasons to fight for gender equality - but could hiring more women make you more money?

What do we want?

Asking customers what they wanted profoundly changed how retailers sold their goods.

Whole foods king

Greg Steltenpohl founded one of America's best-known smoothie brands, but almost lost everything after a major corporate crisis.

Horses for courses

Banks are investing in the centre of cities like Manchester, but are closing branches in the suburbs.

Brass in pocket?

A rise in interest rates would be good news for savers, but bad for borrowers. How would a rise of 0.25% affect you?

Wooden wheels

Japanese researchers are developing new light-but-strong materials combining wood pulp and plastics.

Sugar rush

The UK's sugar beet industry plans to ramp up production as EU quotas come to an end after 50 years.

Ethical model

More businesses are embracing the 'buy one, donate one' model, but can they also turn a profit?

Source: BBC News - Business

BBC News - Business

How the paper clip became a million dollar idea

The BBC's Aaron Heslehurst explains how the paper clip became a million dollar idea and inspired a resistance movement.

Remittances are a 'lifesaver' for many Liberians

Liberia's economy relies heavily on money sent home by family members living abroad.

The app helping people navigating Ghana's nameless streets

A lack of postal addresses in Ghana has prompted authorities to introduce a digital solution.

Universal credit: Tory peer criticises 'insane' wait for payments

Next boss and Tory peer Lord Wolfson says a six-week wait for benefit payments "must be wrong".

How does this look? Be your own virtual make-up artist

French cosmetics chain Sephora is using augmented reality so that customers can try on make-up virtually, before buying it.

Would you eat green satsumas?

Tesco has announced it will start selling green satsumas but would you be willing to eat them?

The 19-year-old millionaire estate agent

Akshay Ruparelia set up his business from his bedroom during his A-level exams.

Putting Canadian wine on the map

How the wines of Canadian winemaker Norman Hardie are winning a growing number of fans around the world.

What has China's president Xi Jinping achieved so far?

Chinese president Xi Jinping will be confirmed for a second five-year term this month.

Bricks and mortar shops are cashing in on online shopping

The rise of online shopping has turned retail upside down but innovative retailers are combining online and offline shopping.

Master brewer: My rookie error

Grain Brewery's founder Phil Halls thought that making beer was easy, but could he overcome his early problems before his business folded?

A brief history of the old pound coin

A brief history of the old pound coin as it drops out of circulation on Monday.

Swipe, scan and go: Staffless, cashless stores

Developments in self-driving vehicles, mobile payments, data analysis and wireless tagging of stock could all completely change our shopping experience.

How Blu Tack became a million dollar idea

The BBC's Aaron Heslehurst explains how Blu Tack became a million dollar idea.

Trouble brews for Darjeeling tea

Darjeeling tea may become more difficult to get hold of. Political unrest halted production for three month this year and this has hit India's entire tea industry.

South Africa's Zanzibaris fight over land development

The minority community in South Africa's Durban fighting locals over a housing development project.

Source: BBC News - Business

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