Business news

BBC News - Business

Brexit causes dramatic drop in UK economy, data suggests

UK economic activity in July fell at its fastest rate since the aftermath of the financial crisis in 2009, data compiled from business questionnaires shows.

Most-affordable places for first-time buyers revealed

The most-affordable - and the least-accessible - places for first-time buyers are revealed by the UK's largest mortgage lender, the Halifax.

'High price' for the lost savings habit

Young families are leaving themselves in a financially fragile state, academics say, amid reports that people are losing the savings habit.

IMF's Lagarde to face trial over payout court confirms

The head of the International Monetary Fund, Christine Lagarde, is to stand trial over €404m payout to French tycoon Bernard Tapie, an appeals court confirms.

Sports Direct staff 'not treated as humans', says MPs' report

Retailer Sports Direct is accused in a report by MPs of failing to treat its workers like human beings.

Chancellor may 'reset' economic policy in Autumn Statement

Chancellor Philip Hammond says he may 'reset' Britain's fiscal policy in the Autumn Statement if post-Brexit data indicates it is necessary.

Desktop banking use falls, as users switch to apps

The use of internet banking on a computer has fallen for the first time, as users switch to mobile apps, according to the banking industry.

Hinkley Point expected to 'get go-ahead'

French energy giant EDF is expected to make its long-awaited investment decision on a new nuclear power plant at Hinkley Point in Somerset next week.

Mastercard swoops for Britain's ATM operator Vocalink

Mastercard offers up to £869m to buy Vocalink, the company that pays wages and operates the UK's ATMs.

Fox News boss Roger Ailes resigns amid sexual harassment charges

Embattled CEO of Fox News Roger Ailes resigns after a number of female employees accused him of sexual harassment.

North Korea economy shrinks most in eight years

North Korea's economy shrinks at its sharpest pace in eight years after a fall global commodity prices, according to South Korea's central bank.

Opel head says 'Brexit decision not a good omen'

General Motors announced it would cut costs in Europe even as the US carmaker announced a second quarter profit that doubled a post-bankruptcy record.

Amazon to enter student loan business

E-commerce giant Amazon has entered the student loan business, teaming up with US bank Wells Fargo to offer lower interest rates to subscribers of its "Prime Student" services.

Wolves bought by Chinese conglomerate Fosun International for £45m

Wolves confirm a takeover by Chinese investors Fosun International, who are thought to have paid £45m for the Championship club.

MPs damn conditions at Sports Direct

Sports Direct founder Mike Ashley must been aware of ‘disgraceful’ conditions, say MPs

MH 370 pilot's sister speaks out

As the search for the missing Malaysia Airlines MH370 is close to being suspended, the BBC talks to the sister of Zaharie Shah, the plane's chief pilot.

Space: A giant leap for Africa

Currently under construction, the MeerKAT telescope in South Africa is establishing its role in scientific research.

Zimbabwe's 'made to order' boot company

The export-focused shoemaker weathering Zimbabwe's economic crisis.

How can Kenya break into new markets?

Manufacturing is a key catalyst for economic growth in many African countries but Kenya is lagging behind.

Sharp increase in use of mobile phone banking apps

There has been a dramatic increase in the number of people using mobile phone apps to do their banking.

Train driver Preeti Kumari: 'Nothing is impossible in life'

Preeti Kumari is one of India's very few female train drivers, and says she always dreamt of doing "something different and challenging".

Singapore searches for more local chefs

The city state has launched a drive to encourage local Singaporeans to train as chefs and service staff, as it tries to plug the gap caused by curbs on foreign labour.

Pokemon Go finally launches in Japan

Nintendo's Pokemon Go is now available for players in Japan, the birthplace of the little monsters, says game developer Niantic Labs.

Japan 'to stop making VCR machines'

The last videocassette recorder (VCR) in Japan is to be produced by the end of the month, according to the Nikkei newspaper.

Coming home?

What will Brexit mean for small towns in Poland that have seen their populations shrink as people left to live and work elsewhere in the EU?

A sister's pain

The sister of missing Malaysia Airlines captain Zaharie Shah tells the BBC about her brother's disappearance, and why the story of MH370 must live on.

Read this, not that!

As publishers struggle to attract eyeballs in the face of increasing competition from online content, can artificial intelligence help them?

Thirteen murders a day

A look at the booming private security industry in the Central American country of Guatemala, where an average of 13 murders are committed every day.

Tumblr's tumble

Three years have passed since Yahoo bought micro-blogging site Tumblr, but it is not the goldmine it once hoped.

Cape hope

A lower cost base and partnerships with western universities is helping South Africa to develop online courses for students around the world.

'Flying' boat

Could F1 and aeronautical tech help Sir Ben Ainslie's 'flying' catamaran win the America's Cup?

Aussie rules?

Australia has been described as "the lucky country", but is it entrepreneurial spirit or abundant resources that has driven its success?

Unhealthy interest?

Google has made headlines for its forays into healthcare but what is its ultimate goal?

Northern Powerhouse

The former Chancellor George Osborne peppered media interviews with references to the "Northern Powerhouse" but what's next for the project since his departure?

Empire strikes back

Technology that makes audiences feel like they are in the movie, rather than just watching it, is helping cinemas sell more tickets at higher prices.

What is ARM?

ARM's technology is at the heart of millions of smartphones and tablets - but the company's inventions are used wider still.

Fighting fit

A profile of Asian businessman Chatri Sityodtong who made his fortune on Wall Street before setting up fast-growing televised martial arts tournament., One Championship.

Going upwards

Food, clothing and electrical items are likely to rise in price as a result of Brexit - but bills may not go up until next year

Game changer

It's early days for Pokemon Go, but some believe the app marks a turning point in mobile video games.

Source: BBC News - Business

BBC News - Business

MPs damn conditions at Sports Direct

Sports Direct founder Mike Ashley must been aware of ‘disgraceful’ conditions, say MPs

MH 370 pilot's sister speaks out

As the search for the missing Malaysia Airlines MH370 is close to being suspended, the BBC talks to the sister of Zaharie Shah, the plane's chief pilot.

Space: A giant leap for Africa

Currently under construction, the MeerKAT telescope in South Africa is establishing its role in scientific research.

Zimbabwe's 'made to order' boot company

The export-focused shoemaker weathering Zimbabwe's economic crisis.

How can Kenya break into new markets?

Manufacturing is a key catalyst for economic growth in many African countries but Kenya is lagging behind.

Sharp increase in use of mobile phone banking apps

There has been a dramatic increase in the number of people using mobile phone apps to do their banking.

Train driver Preeti Kumari: 'Nothing is impossible in life'

Preeti Kumari is one of India's very few female train drivers, and says she always dreamt of doing "something different and challenging".

Singapore searches for more local chefs

The city state has launched a drive to encourage local Singaporeans to train as chefs and service staff, as it tries to plug the gap caused by curbs on foreign labour.

What is India's GST and why does it matter so much?

The Indian government is proposing a centralised Goods and Services Tax to cut through red tape and corruption.

Brexit: 'Spanner in the works' of global growth

The International Monetary Fund (IMF) has said the UK's decision to leave the European Union has "thrown a spanner in the works" of its global growth forecast.

Turf war rages for South Africa's platinum unions

A growing turf war between the two main unions in South Africa's platinum belt creates more unrest amid talks between producers and miners.

India introduces first bankruptcy law

India has put in place its first bankruptcy regulations in a bid to better protect lenders.

Why rising prices are not always a bad thing

The BBC's Andy Verity explains why rising prices are not necessarily a bad thing, particularly for those with long-term debt like mortgages.

BT warns that splitting the firm would 'derail' investment

BT's chairman has warned that splitting Openreach from BT would 'derail' the investments that BT is making in broadband.

How healthy are China's banks?

Concerns remain about the health of parts of China's banking sector - the world's largest.

Britain after Brexit: Dr Gerard Lyons and Louise Cooper

Dr Gerard Lyons and Louise Cooper on how Britain will trade after Brexit.

How F1 tech could help Ben Ainslie win the America's Cup

BBC News goes on board a high-speed catamaran with Sir Ben Ainslie and his team as they practise for the next leg of the America's Cup.

Is Australia's 'luck' in business running out?

How Australian companies are managing to thrive despite the end of the country's mining boom.

Softbank boss Son says ARM is 'investment for the future'

Softbank's acquisition of ARM is a long term strategic investment, its chief executive Masayoshi Son says.

The investor said 'you don't look the part'

Justine Roberts, who founded Mumsnet, offers the business advice she wishes she had been given before she started out, for the BBC News series CEO Secrets.

The cafe with deaf baristas

BBC News visits a cafe in Cape Town, South Africa where the baristas are deaf and customers use sign language to order coffees.

Source: BBC News - Business

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