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BBC News - Business

TSB chaos: 'We are on our knees,' says boss

But the bank's chief tells the BBC it will "come back fighting” after more than six days of IT chaos.

Poundworld and Carpetright add to retail gloom

The discount retailer explores restructuring, as Carpetright's creditors approve a store closure plan.

Waterstones bookshop chain sold to Elliott Advisors

The bookshop chain, which has 283 outlets, is snapped up by investment firm Elliott Advisors.

Wembley: Football Association offered £900m to sell national football stadium

The Football Association receives an offer to sell Wembley Stadium, in a deal understood to be worth £900m.

Facebook's Zuckerberg faces formal summons from MPs

A parliamentary committee says evidence from Facebook's chief technology officer was unsatisfactory.

Lionel Messi wins fight to register himself as trademark

A European court rules after a seven-year legal fight that the football superstar can trademark his name.

Deutsche Bank plans 'significant' job cuts

Germany's biggest lender is to scale back its corporate and investment banking operations.

Nintendo Switch fuels strong rise in profits

The Japanese company's fast-selling console boosts profits, as a new president is announced.

SSE-Npower merger could push up prices, competition body says

The competition watchdog says the planned merger of the two energy giants could face an in-depth inquiry.

Barclays pushed into loss by US payout

The bank says that while it paid $2bn to settle a lawsuit, it resolved a decade-old legacy issue.

Facebook threw us under bus, says data firm Cubeyou

Cubeyou denies that data collected through quizzes on the social media site was misused for marketing.

UK car output slumps on poor demand

Production fell by 13.3% in March, with sharp falls in shipments to the UK and overseas.

Meet people who review Facebook's reported content

'Laura' worked as a content reviewer for Facebook. She describes some of the terrible things she saw.

TSB boss Paul Pester says bank is on its knees over IT chaos

Paul Pester told BBC Radio 5 live that the ongoing chaos has been 'unacceptable'.

How to Hanami: Chasing Japan's cherry blossom season

Japan's cherry blossom festival is a short-lived spring experience that draws millions of visitors.

Can tariffs really save an industry?

As trade tariff controversies continue, US pencil-makers say levies on Chinese imports saved their businesses.

The senior citizens taking on coding

In Singapore, senior citizens are learning how to code computer programs on training courses designed to modernise skills and keep older brains sharp.

'I shouldn't have to police Facebook'

Martin Lewis is taking Facebook to court because of fake adverts showing his face.

Brexit: Five steps to understanding the EU customs union

Five steps to understanding it, ahead of a symbolic vote on the issue this week.

Why I live in a plastic bottle castle

The man building a four-storey castle out of recycled plastic bottles.

Video game loot boxes declared illegal under Belgium gambling laws

The Belgium Gaming Commission finds video game loot boxes violate its gambling legislation.

Galileo: UK plan to launch rival to EU sat-nav system

The UK is looking at its own sat-nav system if the EU locks it out of Galileo because of Brexit.

Teenage money mule

One young woman tells the BBC how she let her bank account be used for money-laundering scam.

#MeToo at work

How companies deal with cases of sexual harassment in the workplace is being scrutinised like never before.

Where's the beef?

The meat industry, a major contributor to CO2 emissions and deforestation, is facing competition.

Makeup makeover

Australian entrepreneurship Jo Horgan turned a love of makeup into 87-strong chain of cosmetics stores.

Brazilian saga

Brazil's Odebrecht scandal is one of the biggest corporate corruption cases in history.

Three-way fight

Once synonymous with cheap flights and pre-breakfast pints - is Stansted Airport about to become glamorous?

Race management

This weekend's London Marathon will make 90,000 compostable cups available for runners.

Solar sailing

How can you create public transport in the jungle without polluting it? The isolated Achuar peoples of Ecuador have created an ingenious solution.

Robo farmers

Farmers are working on robotic solutions due to a shortage of human workers to pick difficult crops.

Recession risk

The World Trade Organization faces challenges on two fronts that threaten the way it does business.

Heartbreak hotel

Chris Richardson's life fell apart after the bank took his hotel and sold it to its own property division.

Distraction tactics

What should parents say to teenagers who seem to be playing on their computers more than revising for exams?

Ninjas and nanobots

Is the fusion of biology and technology speeding us towards a synthetic future?

Tentative steps

The fitness tracking firm, co-founded by James Park, has been struggling in a more competitive market.

Braking news

Automatic braking systems could save 1,000 lives on the UK's roads over the next decade.

Coffee trends

Coffee in five charts: How coffee drinking varies around the world.

Bug hunters

Big rewards are available for hackers who can spot when websites have got their coding wrong.

Roadblock ahead?

A good Brexit deal will be vital to the continuing health of the UK car industry say observers.

Safe home

The Harry Potter author is running an international campaign to stop children being isolated in poor-quality institutions.

'600 apps had my data'

Data harvesting is a multi-billion dollar industry privacy campaigners believe is far too opaque.

Smoothie operator

Richard Reed, one of the co-founders of smoothie firm Innocent, looks back on the company's meteoric growth.

Source: BBC News - Business

BBC News - Business

Meet people who review Facebook's reported content

'Laura' worked as a content reviewer for Facebook. She describes some of the terrible things she saw.

TSB boss Paul Pester says bank is on its knees over IT chaos

Paul Pester told BBC Radio 5 live that the ongoing chaos has been 'unacceptable'.

How to Hanami: Chasing Japan's cherry blossom season

Japan's cherry blossom festival is a short-lived spring experience that draws millions of visitors.

Can tariffs really save an industry?

As trade tariff controversies continue, US pencil-makers say levies on Chinese imports saved their businesses.

The senior citizens taking on coding

In Singapore, senior citizens are learning how to code computer programs on training courses designed to modernise skills and keep older brains sharp.

'I shouldn't have to police Facebook'

Martin Lewis is taking Facebook to court because of fake adverts showing his face.

Brexit: Five steps to understanding the EU customs union

Five steps to understanding it, ahead of a symbolic vote on the issue this week.

Why I live in a plastic bottle castle

The man building a four-storey castle out of recycled plastic bottles.

How whisky tasting 'plays a tune'

A whisky master blender explains how she detects an orchestra of flavours and aromas in Scotland's national drink.

Carney: Brexit talks could delay rate rises

The governor of the Bank of England has said that an interest rate rise is "likely" this year, but any increases will be gradual.

Meet the robots that can pick and plant better than we can

Farmers are turning to robots to plant seedlings and pick produce because of human worker shortages.

Will Africa's open skies project take off?

Challenges lay ahead for Africa's airlines as they are granted greater access to the continent.

Rampa Rammopo: 'Our privately-owned airport is expanding'

Privately-owned Lanseria airport in South Africa has big ambitions to increase its capacity.

The office where the average age of employees is just 25

Staff say they focus on a "life-life" balance, not a work-life balance.

Why India's Paytm isn't afraid of WhatsApp

India's youngest billionaire, Vijay Shekhar Sharma, says Indian firms are ready to challenge the West.

What happens if you ban plastic?

Maharashtra in India has imposed a wide-ranging ban on plastic. How does that affect producers?

Justin Trudeau wants 'seamless' UK trade deal after Brexit

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau wants a deal that will "flip over the day after Brexit".

Bitcoin peaks and falls become race tracks

The rapidly changing value of crypto-currency has been turned into a mobile game.

'Renting is cheaper' as house prices 'too ridiculous'

Leah Wilson, who is in her early 20s, says she struggles to save for a house.

Going for a helicopter pub crawl in Australia

Tourism operators are offering a novel way to find a beer in Australia's vast outback.

Starbucks apologises after Philadelphia arrests

The coffee chain apologises to two black men arrested when a manager refused to let them use a toilet.

Why Wetherspoon has quit social media

Pub chain Wetherspoon has quit social media, so what difference will it make to its business?

What does your perfume say about you?

You can tell a lot about someone by the perfume they wear, says perfumer Roja Dove.

The BMW that really does drive itself

BMW unveils the prototype of a "level 5" autonomous car, which can drive itself on public roads without human intervention. The BBC's Victoria Fritz takes it for a spin.

Bafta Games Awards: Who won on gaming's big night?

A total of 45 games were nominated at Thursday night's Bafta Games Awards in London.

How China's ride-hailing giant plans to conquer the world

It's good to grow up in China, Didi Chuxing boss tells the BBC, but it's now time to go global.

Lagos protests over state tax increases

A controversial property tax has seen residents of Lagos, Nigeria, take to the streets.

'We handmake wooden sunglasses from offcuts'

South African sunglasses entrepreneur Alistair Barnes recycles paper and timber to make his frames.

'Some bottles could be reused 70 times'

UK dairy firms say they've seen an increase in demand for glass milk bottles, amid concern over plastic waste.

5G: What the superfast connection will mean for you

The connection will have speeds of between 10 and 100 times faster than 4G.

How Cambridge Analytica got my private Facebook data

BBC journalist Katie Hile has discovered that she's been affected by the Facebook data scandal.

How airlines are changing our onboard experience

Aaron Heslehurst takes a look at how our flying experience is likely to change.

'You have to tell people why it matters'

You have to tell people why your product matters, says Chris Sheldrick, CEO of what3words.

Why China is targeting US hogs and Harleys

How American livestock and motorcycles became unlikely weapons in a looming trade war.

Airbus builds a new super-transporter

Airbus is building a new super-transporter to carry aircraft parts for assembly at its Toulouse base.

How blue jeans became a million dollar idea

The BBC's Aaron Heslehurst explains how blue jeans became a million dollar idea.

Counting the cost of South Africa's listeriosis outbreak

Having killed more than 180 people, an outbreak of listeriosis could also have a huge financial impact on South Africa.

'I can manufacture better doors here in Rwanda'

The Rwandan door company trying to reduce imports by competing against Western manufacturers.

Source: BBC News - Business

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