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BBC News - Business

The spectacular fall of money manager Neil Woodford

Sacked from his flagship fund, and shutting the business - the story of Neil Woodford and his sudden fall.

Libor rigging inquiry shut down by Serious Fraud Office

The Serious Fraud Office unexpectedly closes an investigation into interest rate fraud.

Are young Brits falling out of love with the cuppa?

Demand for builder's tea is falling, while coffee and herbal teas are becoming popular.

Carney: Brexit deal 'positive' for UK economy

Governor of the Bank of England says deal takes away the threat of a 'disorderly' Brexit.

Boeing staff texted about 737 Max issue in 2016

A pilot allegedly wrote that he had "unknowingly" lied to regulators during tests of the 737 Max.

Bonmarché appoints administrators

The chain's 318 shops will remain open while a buyer is sought for the business.

The UK universities benefitting from opioid money

Two institutions were awarded a combined £3.4m last year from the family behind Purdue Pharma.

Asbestos discovery triggers Johnson & Johnson baby powder recall in US

The firm recalls one batch after regulators find trace amounts of asbestos in a bottle bought online.

Barclays board approved 'sham' Qatar deal

Barclays' board approved an agreement at the heart of fraud charges against former executives, a court hears.

Savile Row in firing line as US tariffs hit the UK

British luxury goods are targeted by the US as new taxes on exports take effect.

Sainsbury's to stop selling fireworks

The supermarket is the first to end sales amid calls for a ban to protect pets and the vulnerable.

China economy: Third quarter growth misses expectations

The world's second largest economy is battling a trade war with the US and slowing domestic demand.

Banning out-of-hours email 'could harm employee wellbeing'

Stopping staff accessing email outside the office could leave some feeling stressed, research suggests.

What's it like working with someone you're married to?

Some couples who work together say it makes both partnerships stronger, but it's not always easy to navigate.

Are US billionaires really going to pay more tax?

For years, the assumption has been that most Americans are anti-tax, but are attitudes changing?

IMF: What is it and why does it matter?

The annual meeting of the IMF gets under way in Washington this week.

Can a new apple take over the world?

Apple growers in Washington state reckon their new variety, the Cosmic Crisp, will be a global hit.

My Money: 'BOOM, suddenly £14.99 less rich!'

As part of a new BBC blog series, Olivia Davies shares what she's spent her money on this week.

Exchange rates: Why has the value of the pound jumped?

A simple guide to how currency is valued and what it means for your finances.

And 'Lo!' - How the internet was born

Interface Message Processors built the Arpanet, which led to the internet of today.

What is the UK's inflation rate?

A guide to what inflation is and why it matters for household finances.

The hungry 26-year-old who set up a £100m food firm

When Timo Boldt realised he wanted to get meal kits delivered, he decided to set up his own firm.

Holy tech! Churches try new ways to connect

Churches are increasingly using social media and specialist software to help reach their congregations.

BA passengers: Cabin fumes affected our health

Passengers on a British Airways flight that filled with smoke mid-air say they're still having breathing difficulties two months on.

My way to stop boardroom infighting

CEO Gordon Wilson says his way to stop execs infighting is for people to open up about themselves.

Staff back at work in former Thomas Cook shops

Former Thomas Cook staff go back to work in their travel shops.

Turning Paris's underground car parks into mushrooms farms

Paris is renovating many of its underground car parks and some are now growing mushrooms.

How the speed camera became a million dollar idea

The BBC's Aaron Heslehurst explains how the speed camera became a million dollar idea.

What does the new £20 note look like?

The BBC's Simon Gompertz explains what the new £20 banknote looks like.

Brexit: Will the flower industry wilt or bloom?

Radio 1 Newsbeat follows a bunch of flowers on its journey from Europe’s largest auction to a florist in Kent.

Source: BBC News - Business

BBC News - Business

BA passengers: Cabin fumes affected our health

Passengers on a British Airways flight that filled with smoke mid-air say they're still having breathing difficulties two months on.

My way to stop boardroom infighting

CEO Gordon Wilson says his way to stop execs infighting is for people to open up about themselves.

Staff back at work in former Thomas Cook shops

Former Thomas Cook staff go back to work in their travel shops.

Turning Paris's underground car parks into mushrooms farms

Paris is renovating many of its underground car parks and some are now growing mushrooms.

How the speed camera became a million dollar idea

The BBC's Aaron Heslehurst explains how the speed camera became a million dollar idea.

What does the new £20 note look like?

The BBC's Simon Gompertz explains what the new £20 banknote looks like.

Brexit: Will the flower industry wilt or bloom?

Radio 1 Newsbeat follows a bunch of flowers on its journey from Europe’s largest auction to a florist in Kent.

Fast-food chain CEO: 'Don't treat business as war'

Doing business isn't like waging a war, says fast-food chain boss John Vincent.

Forecasts of post-Brexit economic gloom 'were accurate'

The Institute for Fiscal Studies says forecasts of post-Brexit economic gloom 'were accurate'.

India shelves crackdown on single-use plastic

India has shelved a planned crackdown on single-use plastic due to business worries over disruption.

Falling felines: Keeping cats in high-rise flats safe

If you're a cat owner in a high-rise apartment in Singapore, how do you keep your cat safe?

How the highlighter pen became a million dollar idea

The BBC's Aaron Heslehurst explains how the highlighter pen became a million dollar idea.

Warburtons 'on the verge of compostable packaging'

Chairman of bakery tells 5 Live the firm is close to replacing unrecyclable wax paper.

'The letter said I would have to wait five years for my pension'

Krissy Abbott had to depend on food banks and handouts, when she was expecting to live on her state pension - but her retirement age had changed from 60 to 65.

Thomas Cook employees protest at Parliament

Former employees of Thomas Cook hand in a petition to the government demanding answers about the company's collapse.

Operation Matterhorn: Thomas Cook customers fly home on an Airbus A380

'Operation Matterhorn' is the UK's largest peacetime repatriation effort, costing around £100m.

How powerful is the Chinese military?

BBC News looks at how powerful China's military is, compared to that of the USA.

Parisians fight climate change with a surprising weapon

An initiative in Paris is trying to persuade restaurants to turn food waste into compost.

'I built my software empire from a Stoke council house'

Entrepreneur Stephen Parker describes his quest to build a software empire from Stoke.

How the 'Happy Birthday' song became a million dollar idea

The BBC's Aaron Heslehurst explains how the "Happy Birthday" song became a million dollar idea.

'My Thomas Cook job made me the envy of everybody'

Marina Bridger worked for the travel firm for 38 years and retired several years ago.

We Are Stoke-on-Trent: The ups and downs of student life

Staffordshire University is one of the smallest in the UK, but has some quirky degree courses.

Source: BBC News - Business

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